About Breast Thermography

Did you know that one in eight women will develop an invasive breast cancer in their lifetime? If you knew what tools were available to you would you do everything possible and take all the necessary steps to lessen your chances of developing cancer? The answer is Breast Thermography, which is a promising screening tool that is used as an adjunct to mammography. A breast thermogram is 15 minute non-invasive, non-radiation test of physiology.  Thermography detects the subtle physiologic changes that accompany breast pathology, whether it is cancer, fibrocystic disease, an infection or a vascular disease.

To understand how thermography works we must first look at how cancer spreads. Cancers need nutrients to maintain or accelerate their growth. In order to facilitate the process, new blood vessels are formed through a process known as neoangiogenesis. This vascular process causes an increase in surface temperature in the affected regions which can be viewed with infrared cameras. Additionally, the newly formed blood vessels have a distinct appearance, which thermography can detect.

The most promising aspect of thermography is its ability to detect anomalies years before mammography. Studies have shown that by the time a tumor has grown to be a sufficient size to be detectable by physical examination or mammography it has in fact been growing for seven years. A mammogram can detect a tumor once it is about 12-15 mm in size, whereas thermography can detect a tumor 2 mm in size. It is a great screening tool for women as young as 25 to serve as a good baseline against future changes that might occur in the breasts. Why wait until 50 years of age to get screened for breast cancer when there are screening tools like thermography that are safe and extremely effective? Take charge of your own breast health and find a certified thermography physician today.

  1. DrSabrinaDC.com

Read more about Dr. Sabrina on her bio page here

 

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